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Spirit is published three times per year by the Texas A&M Foundation, which manages major gifts and endowments for the benefit of academic programs, scholarships and student activities at Texas A&M University.

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FORMIDABLE MISSION

How Texas A&M University’s Veteran Resource and Support Center assists student veterans as they mobilize from military to academic life.
BY KARA BOUNDS SOCOL
While transitioning to Texas A&M University can prove difficult for any new student, the additional challenges faced by military veterans can make academic success particularly daunting.

Retired Marine Corps Col. Gerald “Jerry” Smith ’82 and retired Army Sgt. Maj. Donald Freeman understand where these veterans are coming from. Through the university’s Veteran Resource and Support Center (VRSC), director Smith and assistant director Freeman provide programs and services focused on helping veterans transition to the classroom and, ultimately, to the workforce.

Smith and Freeman explained that student veterans are typically older than traditional students and are unemployed for the first time in years. At Texas A&M, roughly 40 percent are first-generation college students and approximately half are married—many with children. In addition, they must adjust from strictly structured days filled with orders to an environment where they make their own decisions and manage their own time.

At the VRSC, veterans can interact with other veterans and their families, acquire a peer mentor, garner academic and professional support, connect with the local community and secure financial assistance.

But as one of the smallest departments in Texas A&M’s Division of Student Affairs, the VRSC’s budget is also one of the smallest. As a result, the rapid growth of critical student veteran programs has only been possible through generous donor support. Based on the historical ebbs and flows of student veteran support, Smith underscores the critical need for permanent funding sources to ensure the center’s long-term effectiveness.

“We owe those who have served our country as much transition support as possible,” he said. “The only way to ensure that this support is adequate is to endow the center and its quality programs. These students served our country and put an education and sometimes a family on hold. It’s our job to take care of them as they start the transition to college.”

FACES OF SERVICE

HOW THE VRSC SUPPORTS FIVE AGGIE STUDENT VETERANS

01/05

Ennis Rios ’19 ’21
U.S. NAVY

Ennis Rios ’19 ’21 knew he’d never go to college. In fact, he didn’t even finish high school. Instead, in 1999, he enlisted in the Navy. For 15 years, he served as an information systems technician, specializing in computer, radio and satellite communications—a vital skill set that often found him accompanying Navy SEALS on high-stakes missions.

While stationed in Stuttgart, Germany, Rios met civilian contractor Ambyr Acton ’09, who would become his wife. Acton challenged him about his lack of education. Although still intimidated by the thought of college, Rios decided to give it a try.

With a pipedream of attending Texas A&M, he sought out the VRSC. Military admissions counselor and adviser Karen Allen answered his call. He was blown away by the amount of time she visited with him and by the advice she shared. “This staff member at this well-respected university who had never met me was already invested in my success,” he said.

A year and a half later, at the age of 37, Rios entered Texas A&M as a geographic information science and technology major. He not only took advantage of the camaraderie, support and financial assistance of the VRSC, but also joined the Corps of Cadets’ Delta Company, comprised of military veterans. Ultimately, he became deputy Corps commander in an effort to mentor young cadets who were constantly seeking his advice.

Rios received his bachelor’s degree in the spring and is now pursuing a master’s degree in water management and hydrological science. A doctorate, he said, might even be on the horizon. “Every few weeks, I catch myself staring at my Texas A&M diploma on the wall,” he said. “It’s just incredible.”

02/05

Nethaniel Gjesdal ’18 ’20
U.S. ARMY

From his days in Iraq as an Army combat medic to his ultimate goal of becoming a state congressman, Nethaniel Gjesdal ’18 ’20 does not shy away from a challenge. As indicated by his decision to pursue not one, but two Texas A&M degrees, he’s also resolute about making a plan and determining what it will take to get there.

So, when the Louisiana native decided to leave active duty in 2012 after six years as an 82nd Airborne Division paratrooper, he moved to San Antonio, got a job, enrolled in community college and immediately began researching veteran-friendly universities.

He landed on Texas A&M. “What strongly attracted me was the way Texas A&M treats student veterans in comparison to other schools,” he said.

To cope with the challenges of transitioning from military to academic life, Gjesdal immersed himself in VRSC support. This assistance came in myriad forms, from the social support of the Aggie Veteran Network to the financial support of the Aggie Shields textbook loan program. He also served as president of the university’s Student Veterans Association, which works closely with the VRSC.

“The VRSC is the hub for any of your needs,” Gjesdal, now 31, said. “You walk in there with a question and you leave with an answer, a phone number or a contact name. That’s just what they do.”

Gjesdal earned a bachelor’s degree in sociology in 2018. He is now working toward a Master of Public Service and Administration at the Bush School of Government and Public Service.

03/05

Stephen Lozier ’19
U.S. COAST GUARD

Ask Coast Guard veteran Stephen Lozier ’19, and he’ll readily tell you that the challenge of transitioning from military to academic life lies in the small changes it entails: picking out clothes other than uniforms, trying to determine the degree of formality preferred by individual professors, and trading in rigidly structured days for largely unscheduled ones. That’s not to mention the stress of going from steady employment to life without a paycheck, or the long hours focused on catching up with classmates who came directly from undergraduate engineering programs.

“At first, it was a really tough adjustment,” Lozier, 29, said of his first semester pursuing a master’s degree in industrial engineering. “There were a lot of stringent academic and etiquette skills I had to relearn when I entered Texas A&M.”

Thankfully, he said, the door to the VRSC is always open and staffed by those who help him find answers to any and all questions.

A native of Houston, Lozier graduated from the U.S. Coast Guard Academy in 2013 with a bachelor’s degree in operations research. For two years, he served as a deck watch officer involved in counter-human-trafficking and counter-drug operations in the Western Pacific. This was followed by a year completing security missions in the Middle East as part of Operation Enduring Freedom. Upon returning to the states, Lozier was stationed in Galveston, where he captained his own ship and led safety, search and rescue, and border operations.

Lozier’s long-term goal is to earn an MBA and become an industrial engineer in the corporate world. In the meantime, he is focused on three short-term goals: graduating, getting married and restoring his vintage Harley Davidson.

04/05

Keefer Patterson ’18 ’20
U.S. AIR FORCE

When Keefer Patterson ’18 ’20 traded in military life for academic life, he also traded in British life for life back in the states.

As an aviation maintenance technician for the KC-135 Stratotanker aerial refueling aircraft, Patterson spent nearly four years in the U.S. Air Force stationed at Royal Air Force Mildenhall in Suffolk, England.

By the time Patterson entered Texas A&M, he was a 24-year-old with little idea of what he wanted to do. Based on his interests, advisers in the VRSC suggested he major in agricultural communications and journalism. The combination of science classes with writing, photojournalism and leadership-focused courses turned out to be a perfect fit.

The VRSC’s role in Patterson’s college life continued long after he chose a major. It was the “go-to” place to get answers. It also helped him financially, from its Aggie Shields textbook loan program to scholarship and study abroad support. In a nutshell, he said, the VRSC staff frequently stepped in “as a lifeline or a guideline.”

“The VRSC staff know what you need because they know what you’ve been through,” he continued. “We’re all a big family.”

After attaining his bachelor’s degree, Patterson’s longtime admiration of retired Air Force Gen. Mark Welsh III inspired him to continue his education at Texas A&M’s Bush School of Government and Public Service, where Welsh serves as dean. As a Master of Public Service and Administration student, Patterson hopes to eventually work in security policy or national defense.

05/05

Dawn Bybee ’19
U.S. MARINE CORPS

As a Marine Corps intelligence analyst, Staff Sgt. Dawn Bybee ’19 knows firsthand the importance of fully understanding complicated—and often foreign—languages and cultures. This was true both when she was deployed to Afghanistan and when she began contemplating a college education.

“It’s intimidating to go to a new unit when you’re in the Marine Corps, but you generally know what to expect,” she explained. “In attending college, though, you don’t know what to expect. It’s important to have someone who can translate the college experience.”

So, when the California native’s college search led her to Texas A&M and its VRSC, she had a strong feeling where she would land. “At the VRSC, they speak my language,” she said.

Bybee, 29, is attending Texas A&M thanks to the Marine Corps Enlisted Commissioning Education Program, which enables her to retain her active duty status and income. She is also the recipient of one of the VRSC’s major scholarships. Bybee plans to graduate in December with a university studies degree in religious thought, practices and cultures.

While at Texas A&M, Bybee trains with Naval ROTC members in the Corps of Cadets and helps teach military courses. Mentoring young cadets, she said, is among the highlights of her college experience.

When she returns to her Marine Corps career full time, Bybee will do so as a newly commissioned officer with a new outlook for her future. “Through my years in the Marine Corps, I’ve found that officers with a college degree are the most respected and receive the most leadership opportunities,” she said. “Now, I’ll be one of them.”

FACES OF SERVICE

HOW THE VRSC SUPPORTS FIVE AGGIE STUDENT VETERANS

01/05

Ennis Rios ’19 ’21
U.S. NAVY

Ennis Rios ’19 ’21 knew he’d never go to college. In fact, he didn’t even finish high school. Instead, in 1999, he enlisted in the Navy. For 15 years, he served as an information systems technician, specializing in computer, radio and satellite communications—a vital skill set that often found him accompanying Navy SEALS on high-stakes missions.

While stationed in Stuttgart, Germany, Rios met civilian contractor Ambyr Acton ’09, who would become his wife. Acton challenged him about his lack of education. Although still intimidated by the thought of college, Rios decided to give it a try.

With a pipedream of attending Texas A&M, he sought out the VRSC. Military admissions counselor and adviser Karen Allen answered his call. He was blown away by the amount of time she visited with him and by the advice she shared. “This staff member at this well-respected university who had never met me was already invested in my success,” he said.

A year and a half later, at the age of 37, Rios entered Texas A&M as a geographic information science and technology major. He not only took advantage of the camaraderie, support and financial assistance of the VRSC, but also joined the Corps of Cadets’ Delta Company, comprised of military veterans. Ultimately, he became deputy Corps commander in an effort to mentor young cadets who were constantly seeking his advice.

Rios received his bachelor’s degree in the spring and is now pursuing a master’s degree in water management and hydrological science. A doctorate, he said, might even be on the horizon. “Every few weeks, I catch myself staring at my Texas A&M diploma on the wall,” he said. “It’s just incredible.”

02/05

Nethaniel Gjesdal ’18 ’20
U.S. ARMY

From his days in Iraq as an Army combat medic to his ultimate goal of becoming a state congressman, Nethaniel Gjesdal ’18 ’20 does not shy away from a challenge. As indicated by his decision to pursue not one, but two Texas A&M degrees, he’s also resolute about making a plan and determining what it will take to get there.

So, when the Louisiana native decided to leave active duty in 2012 after six years as an 82nd Airborne Division paratrooper, he moved to San Antonio, got a job, enrolled in community college and immediately began researching veteran-friendly universities.

He landed on Texas A&M. “What strongly attracted me was the way Texas A&M treats student veterans in comparison to other schools,” he said.

To cope with the challenges of transitioning from military to academic life, Gjesdal immersed himself in VRSC support. This assistance came in myriad forms, from the social support of the Aggie Veteran Network to the financial support of the Aggie Shields textbook loan program. He also served as president of the university’s Student Veterans Association, which works closely with the VRSC.

“The VRSC is the hub for any of your needs,” Gjesdal, now 31, said. “You walk in there with a question and you leave with an answer, a phone number or a contact name. That’s just what they do.”

Gjesdal earned a bachelor’s degree in sociology in 2018. He is now working toward a Master of Public Service and Administration at the Bush School of Government and Public Service.

03/05

Stephen Lozier ’19
U.S. COAST GUARD

Ask Coast Guard veteran Stephen Lozier ’19, and he’ll readily tell you that the challenge of transitioning from military to academic life lies in the small changes it entails: picking out clothes other than uniforms, trying to determine the degree of formality preferred by individual professors and trading in rigidly structured days for largely unscheduled ones. That’s not to mention the stress of going from steady employment to life without a paycheck, or the long hours focused on catching up with classmates who came directly from undergraduate engineering programs.

“At first, it was a really tough adjustment,” Lozier, 29, said of his first semester pursuing a master’s degree in industrial engineering. “There were a lot of stringent academic and etiquette skills I had to relearn when I entered Texas A&M.”

Thankfully, he said, the door to the VRSC is always open and staffed by those who help him find answers to any and all questions.

A native of Houston, Lozier graduated from the U.S. Coast Guard Academy in 2013 with a bachelor’s degree in operations research. For two years, he served as a deck watch officer involved in counter-human-trafficking and counter-drug operations in the Western Pacific. This was followed by a year completing security missions in the Middle East as part of Operation Enduring Freedom. Upon returning to the states, Lozier was stationed in Galveston, where he captained his own ship and led safety, search and rescue, and border operations.

Lozier’s long-term goal is to earn an MBA and become an industrial engineer in the corporate world. In the meantime, he is focused on three short-term goals: graduating, getting married and restoring his vintage Harley Davidson.

04/05

Keefer Patterson ’18 ’20
U.S. AIR FORCE

When Keefer Patterson ’18 ’20 traded in military life for academic life, he also traded in British life for life back in the states.

As an aviation maintenance technician for the KC-135 Stratotanker aerial refueling aircraft, Patterson spent close to four years in the U.S. Air Force stationed at Royal Air Force Mildenhall in Suffolk, England.

By the time Patterson entered Texas A&M, he was a 24-year-old with little idea of what he wanted to do. Based on his interests, advisers in the VRSC suggested he major in agricultural communications and journalism. The combination of science classes with writing, photojournalism and leadership-focused courses turned out to be a perfect fit.

The VRSC’s role in Patterson’s college life continued long after he chose a major. It was the “go-to” place to get answers. It also helped him financially, from its Aggie Shields textbook loan program to scholarship and study abroad support. In a nutshell, he said, the VRSC staff frequently stepped in “as a lifeline or a guideline.”

“The VRSC staff know what you need because they know what you’ve been through,” he continued. “We’re all a big family.”

After attaining his bachelor’s degree, Patterson’s longtime admiration of retired Air Force Gen. Mark Welsh III inspired him to continue his education at Texas A&M’s Bush School of Government and Public Service, where Welsh is now dean. As a Master of Public Service and Administration student, Patterson hopes to eventually work in security policy or national defense.

05/05

Dawn Bybee ’19
U.S. MARINE CORPS

As a Marine Corps intelligence analyst, Staff Sgt. Dawn Bybee ’19 knows firsthand the importance of fully understanding complicated—and often foreign—languages and cultures. This was true both when she was deployed to Afghanistan and when she began contemplating a college education.

“It’s intimidating to go to a new unit when you’re in the Marine Corps, but you generally know what to expect,” she explained. “In going to college, though, you don’t know what to expect. It’s important to have someone who can translate the college experience.”

So, when the California native’s college search led her to Texas A&M and its VRSC, she had a strong feeling where she would land. At the VRSC, she said, “they speak my language.”

Bybee, 29, is attending Texas A&M thanks to the Marine Corps Enlisted Commissioning Education Program, which enables her to retain her active duty status and income. She is also the recipient of one of the VRSC’s major scholarships. Bybee plans to graduate in December with a university studies degree in religious thought, practices and cultures.

While at Texas A&M, Bybee trains with Naval ROTC members in the Corps of Cadets and helps teach military courses. Mentoring these young cadets, she said, is among the highlights of her college experience.

When she returns to her Marine Corps career full time, Bybee will do so as a newly commissioned officer with a new outlook for her future. “Through my years in the Marine Corps, I’ve found that officers with a college degree are the most respected and receive the most leadership opportunities,” she said. “Now, I’ll be one of them.”

SUPPORT AGGIE STUDENT VETERANS

THE VRSC'S BIGGEST NEEDS AND HOW YOU CAN HELP

As Texas A&M’s military-friendly reputation spreads, the university will undoubtedly welcome an increasing number of veterans. To ensure that these students’ unique needs are met long into the future, VRSC programs and veteran-specific scholarships must receive sources of permanent funding. While the Texas A&M Foundation welcomes any size gift to support these initiatives, the specific gift amounts listed below will successfully achieve this permanent funding status by establishing designated endowments.

Name the Veteran Resource and Support Center ($10 million)

The VRSC was originally housed in a tiny area in Texas A&M’s John J. Koldus Student Services Building. While the center recently moved to a temporary space in the basement of the Memorial Student Center (MSC), more room and resources are required to meet the growing needs of Aggie student veterans. This endowed gift would fund a new and much larger permanent home for the veteran center in the MSC, allowing more space for program needs and, potentially, additional staff members. The endowment would also supply a constant stream of funds for veteran scholarships and VRSC operations and programs.

Veteran Aggie Leaders for Outreach and Resources (VALOR) Program ($500,000)

VALOR is a mentorship program that connects incoming veterans with experienced student veterans. These mentors not only help newer student veterans succeed academically and navigate the complexities of a huge university, but also give them support in their overall transition from military to civilian life.

→ Give Now to Support the VALOR Program

Aggie Shields ($500,000)

This hugely popular textbook loan program offsets the high cost of textbooks for Texas A&M’s student veterans, their dependents and their survivors. The loan library is student-run and operated primarily by student volunteers without any military affiliation. In one year alone, Aggie Shields saved textbook recipients almost $90,000. The program needs approximately $20,000 per year to operate. While gifts to support one or more years of program operations are welcome, a $500,000 endowed gift would allow the program to be self-supporting.

→ Give Now to Support the Aggie Shields Program

Warrior-Scholar Project (WSP) ($1 million)

The national nonprofit Warrior-Scholar Project operates intensive on-campus academic bootcamps at the nation’s leading universities. The goal is to help student veterans rediscover the skills and confidence necessary to succeed as they seek their first college degree. Participants are first-generation college students—at Texas A&M or other institutions—and current or former enlisted soldiers. They represent all military branches. Texas A&M is the only university in the state to host this program, which it recently expanded from one to two weeks. Among Texas A&M’s WSP goals is to increase the number of female and other underrepresented student veteran participants.

→ Give to the Warrior-Scholar Project

Veteran scholarships

While student veterans enjoy G.I. Bill benefits, this funding source only goes so far. In fact, one of the top reasons student veterans and their spouses fail to graduate is their inability to keep up with college costs. The Texas A&M Foundation offers three endowed scholarships for student veterans:

Aggie Veteran Freedom Scholarships ($100,000)
These premier veteran scholarships assist student veterans who have demonstrated exceptional leadership and sacrifice. They provide the largest annual award, defraying the cost of tuition and expenses by $4,000 each academic year.

Aggie Veteran Patriot Scholarships ($50,000)
These scholarships focus on deserving students with demonstrated financial need. Recipients receive $2,000 each academic year for tuition and expenses.

Aggie Veteran Honor Scholarships ($25,000)
These scholarships serve as the foundation for the veteran scholarship program. They defray the cost of tuition and expenses by $1,000 each academic year.

→ Give Now to Support Veteran Scolarships
Vet Camp ($200,000)

Much like Texas A&M’s Fish Camp, the VRSC’s Vet Camp is an in-depth orientation program that introduces new student veterans to the resources available to successfully transition to the university. Among those involved in the event are Texas A&M academic advisers, the Career Center, the Scholarships & Financial Aid office and community groups. New students also meet current student veterans who “speak their language” and help them prepare for academic success. Support for Vet Camp can entail creating a named individual excellence fund or even securing naming rights for the program itself.

→ Give Now to Support Vet Camp

Student Aggie Veteran Enhancement (SAVE) Fund (varying amounts)

This emergency fund is awarded in times of crisis when a student veteran risks dropping out of Texas A&M. While most student veterans rely on carefully balanced combinations of military benefits, scholarships, grants, loans and personal savings to meet their college and living costs, extreme or unusual circumstances can derail their education. This is where SAVE steps in, with awarded funds typically ranging from $500 to $2,000. Of those who have received SAVE funds, 97 percent have remained in school or graduated.

→ Give Now to Support the SAVE Fund

Women Veterans Program ($100,000)

Texas A&M’s Women Veterans Program has a three-pronged mission: support the university’s female student veterans, recruit more of these veterans to Texas A&M, and provide the campus and the larger community with opportunities to learn about women in the military. Texas boasts the nation’s largest number of female veterans, yet Texas A&M’s enrollment of these veterans is below the national average. To effectively engage the university’s female veterans and bolster recruitment efforts, the VRSC is working with other campus entities to develop programs and outreach efforts that specifically target this group. An endowed gift will increase outreach efforts and help meet the needs of this unique subpopulation of Texas A&M student veterans.

Name the Veteran Resource and Support Center ($10 million)

The VRSC was originally housed in a tiny area in Texas A&M’s John J. Koldus Student Services Building. While the center recently moved to a temporary space in the basement of the Memorial Student Center (MSC), more room and resources are required to meet the needs of Aggie student veterans. This endowed gift would fund a new and much larger permanent home for the veteran center in the MSC, allowing more space for program needs and, potentially, additional staff members. The endowment would also supply a constant stream of funds for veteran scholarships and VRSC operations and programs.

Veteran Aggie Leaders for Outreach and Resources (VALOR) Program ($500,000)

VALOR is a mentorship program that connects incoming veterans with experienced veteran students. These mentors not only help newer veteran students succeed academically and navigate the complexities of a huge university, but also give them support in their overall transition from military to civilian life.

→ Give Now to Support the VALOR Program

Aggie Shields ($500,000)

This hugely popular textbook loan program offsets the high cost of textbooks for Texas A&M’s student veterans, their dependents and their survivors. The loan library is student-run and operated primarily by student volunteers without any military affiliation. In one year alone, Aggie Shields saved textbook recipients almost $90,000. The program needs approximately $20,000 per year to operate. While gifts to support one or more years of program operations are welcome, a $500,000 endowed gift would allow the program to be self-supporting.

→ Give Now to Support the Aggie Shields Program

Warrior-Scholar Project (WSP) ($1 million)

The national nonprofit Warrior-Scholar Project operates intensive on-campus academic bootcamps at the nation’s leading universities. The goal is to help student veterans rediscover the skills and confidence necessary to succeed as they seek their first college degree. Participants are first-generation college students—at Texas A&M or other institutions—and current or former enlisted soldiers. They represent all military branches. Texas A&M is the only university in the state to host this program, which it recently expanded from one to two weeks. Among Texas A&M’s WSP goals is to increase the number of female and other underrepresented student veteran participants.

→ Give to the Warrior-Scholar Project

Veteran scholarships

While student veterans enjoy G.I. Bill benefits, this funding source only goes so far. In fact, one of the top reasons student veterans and their spouses fail to graduate is their inability to keep up with college costs. The Texas A&M Foundation offers three endowed scholarships for student veterans:

Aggie Veteran Freedom Scholarships ($100,000)
These premier veteran scholarships assist student veterans who have demonstrated exceptional leadership and sacrifice. They provide the largest annual award, defraying the cost of tuition and expenses by $4,000 each academic year.

Aggie Veteran Patriot Scholarships ($50,000)
These scholarships focus on deserving students with demonstrated financial need. Recipients receive $2,000 each academic year for tuition and expenses.

Aggie Veteran Honor Scholarships ($25,000)
These scholarships serve as the foundation for the veteran scholarship program. They defray the cost of tuition and expenses by $1,000 each academic year.

→ Give Now to Support Veteran Scolarships
Vet Camp ($200,000)

Much like Texas A&M’s Fish Camp, the VRSC’s Vet Camp is an in-depth orientation program that introduces new student veterans to the resources available to successfully transition to the university. Among those involved in the event are Texas A&M academic advisers, the Career Center, the Scholarships & Financial Aid office and community groups. New students also meet current student veterans who “speak their language” and help them prepare for academic success. Support for Vet Camp can entail creating a named individual excellence fund or even securing naming rights for the program itself.

→ Give Now to Support Vet Camp

Student Aggie Veteran Enhancement (SAVE) Fund (varying amounts)

This emergency fund is awarded in times of crisis when a student veteran risks dropping out of Texas A&M. While most student veterans rely on carefully balanced combinations of military benefits, scholarships, grants, loans and personal savings to meet their college and living costs, extreme or unusual circumstances can derail their education. This is where SAVE steps in, with awarded funds typically ranging from $500 to $2,000. Of those veterans who have received SAVE funds, 97 percent have remained in school or graduated.

→ Give Now to Support the SAVE Fund

Women Veterans Program ($100,000)

Texas A&M’s Women Veterans Program has a three-pronged mission: support the university’s female student veterans, recruit more of these veterans to Texas A&M, and provide the campus and the larger community with opportunities to learn about women in the military. Texas boasts the nation’s largest number of female veterans, yet Texas A&M’s enrollment of these veterans is below the national average. To effectively engage the university’s female veterans and bolster recruitment efforts, the VRSC is working with other campus entities to develop programs and outreach efforts that specifically target this group. An endowed gift will increase outreach efforts and help meet the needs of this unique subpopulation of Texas A&M student veterans.

Hear from five Aggie student veterans as they discuss their experiences at Texas A&M and how the Veteran Resource and Support Center helps them navigate campus life.

Texas A&M ranks No. 1 for
"Best Colleges for Veterans"

IN RANKINGS BY BEST VALUE SCHOOLS
Roughly 1,150 Aggie student veterans attend Texas A&M.
Enrollment has doubled in 5 years.

ABOUT 0%

of student veterans will exhaust their GI Bill benefits before they graduate.

ABOUT 0%

of student veterans work one or more part-time jobs to make ends meet while they are in school.

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49%

are married and
have children.

49%

are graduate
students.

52%

served in combat

49%

are married and
have children.

49%

are graduate
students.

52%

served in combat

5.1

average years of service

27-34

typical age range
of student veterans

Contact:

Dave "Fuji" Fujimoto '17

Director of Development, Veterans Affairs
Division of Student Affairs